All posts by Sophie

oh gar edoken hemin ho Theos pneuma deilias, alla dynameos kai agapes kai sophronismou

How Invalidating My Bipolar Disorder Invalidates Me

SOURCE: https://www.nami.org/Personal-Stories/How-Invalidating-My-Bipolar-Disorder-Invalidates-M

Excerpts :

“I wouldn’t tell anyone you have it. They’ll judge you and treat you differently.” “I wouldn’t tell your boss. It could affect your job.”

Sadly, this is often true. I’ve experienced it first hand and usually the ones who give this response are others that have dealt with the repercussions of disclosing their mental illness. I’ve done this many, many times. I’m quite good at it. I push through it. I smile when I am miserable. I slink off somewhere to manage an anxiety attack. I don’t talk to anyone when I am depressed.

When I reveal it, it is often not met kindly. However, that’s the reason I have decided to talk about it even more. The stigma is there because most keep quiet. This is what emboldens me to share my experiences. You never know who is suffering mentally. You can say you have a physical disease and most often, you are treated with concern or empathy. If you mention a mental disorder, the subject gets changed or the conversation get quiet. It’s an isolating experience.

How to Help a Friend Through a Suicidal Crisis

pic credit: 🌻 Sophs

Sometimes we can be put in this situation, and we don’t know what to do. Below are some suggestions on how to be effective in dealing with the situation.

DO:

• Reach out

• Ask questions

• Show that you care

• Encourage your friend to talk

• Listens without making judgements

• Talk openly about suicide

• Remain calm

• Suggest people you can both turn to

• Know your limits

• Get help

• Act quickly if you think your friend is in danger

DON’T:

• Make your friend’s problem sound unimportant

• Act shocked

• Keep your friend’s suicide plans secret

• Ask your friend to think about how his or her suicide would make others feel

• Try to take any weapon away from your friend

• Leave your friend alone when he or she is in crisis

• Give up hope

Credit: The Power to Prevent Suicide : A Guide for Teens Helping Teens by Richard E. Nelson, Ph.D., and Judith C. Galas.

background photo credit: Gerrit Vermeulen on Unsplash.

18 Ways to prepare for and cope with difficult days of TDR — Treatment-resistant depression

Music 🎶 helps me a lot … “Then, when I am not feeling well and I find it harder to escape, I can use those same songs to connect to happier times and escape my reality even for a few minutes and give myself a break.”…

🌻 Sophie’s Note 📝. I struggle a lot with depression bouts because of my Bipolar 2 … and I find that there are days when meds don’t work, and I just have to push through it.

This article is based on people’s experience living with TRD – Treatment-resistant depression, and I find many of the suggestions helpful. I hope it can help you too …

SOURCE: https://themighty.com/2020/05/18-ways-to-prepare-for-and-cope-with-difficult-days-of-treatment-res/

Healing … ❤️

pic credit: 🌻 Sophs

Healing … does not mean the damage never existed. It means the damage no longer controls our lives.

quote credit: unknown

background photo credit: Jay Castor on Unsplash

A Tale of Mental Illness — From the Inside – Elyn Saks.

A professor with schizophrenia – Elyn Saks has chronic schizophrenia, and she is a professor of law, psychology and psychiatry at USC. She might have spent her life in the back ward of a hospital, but that’s not what happened.

Elyn Saks is a law scholar at USC and author who fights for the rights of people with mental illness. Too often, Saks believes, decisions are made for these individuals without taking their desires into account.

She’s here to tell us her story. This is, she hastens to add, her own experience. “Everyone becomes psychotic in his or her own ways.”

What schizophrenia is

Schizophrenia is a brain disease, and the defining feature is psychosis — or being out of touch with reality. Involving loose associations and hallucinations. For example, during her episodes she often has the feeling that she had killed hundreds of thousands of people with her thoughts, or that nuclear explosions are about to be set off in her brain. She reminds us that, “It is not the same as multiple personalities. It’s not split, but shattered.”

SOURCE https://blog.ted.com/seeing-mental-illness-elyn-saks-at-tedglobal2012/